Early American History Primary Jumbo Pack

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From: $149.13

From Beautiful Feet Books:

Sure to ignite curiosity about our nation’s history, this newly revised and updated Early American History Through Literature study will take you and your K-3 students through the first Indigenous people of the Americas, the Vikings discovery of America, the exploration, colonization, settlement, and establishment of the United States. Spanning 1000 AD to the mid-1800’s this guide makes teaching this literature-rich study easy and fun!

Early American History Primary Study Guide

The Award-winning Early American History Through Literature study guide has been completely revised and expanded . Now in full-color it includes additional books, resources, activities, comprehension questions, and web links. This guide will take you and your K-3 students from the year 1000 AD with the Vikings discoveries, exploration, colonization, Revolution and Western Expansion to the mid-1800's with the Civil War. Used as a one or two year study, parents will read aloud award-winning literature from great authors such as the D'Aulaires, Walter Edmonds, Alice Dalgliesh, Clyde Robert Bulla and others. Organized into easily followed lessons, students ( and parents!) will learn the history of America along with corresponding biblical principles, poetry, geography, character studies and much more! Though designed as a one-year course, it can be stretched to two years, depending on your pace. Contains 107 lessons and it is suggested that 2-3 lessons be completed each week.

Be sure to download the free picture packet that accompanies this study. These are coloring pictures referenced in the Teacher Guide.

$23.31 each

Leif the Lucky

Considered by some children's book authorities to be the d'Aulaire's finest work, this biography of Leif Erickson, son of Eric the Red, best exemplifies the artist's skill in Norwegian folk art, style, and history. Their well-researched text is lavishly illustrated with Viking rune-like carvings, from the dragon prow of the ship that Leif must hurry to remove, lest it anger the spirits of the land, to the stave churches so unique to Norway. Landscapes depict emerald green fjords against floes of ice and mountains of snow. The grand halls of King Olav Trygvason are ornamented with carvings of Nordic mythical creatures while tame polar bear cubs romp and play.

In this setting the young Leif grows to manhood and learns the skills of navigation, sailing his own ship when just a teen from Greenland to Norway. It is on his return journey that he discovers a new land—which is now known as Newfoundland. Later he sends settlers there—actually establishing a colony. His tale is aptly and authentically told in the d'Aulaires's inimitable style.

The Discovery of the Americas

From the crossing of the Bering Land Bridge over 20,000 years ago to the arrival of the Europeans, this classic picture book paints the early discoveries of America in grand strokes. The text is useful for both the classroom and at home as it combines beautiful landscape illustrations with factual features: maps, timelines, chronological tables, and easy-to-use appendixes.

Columbus

As is their custom, the d'Aulaires have thoroughly researched their subject in order to provide the most historically accurate account of the life of the man Samuel Eliot Morrison called "the greatest mariner that ever lived." In their pursuit, the d'Aulaires traveled to Spain, Portugal, and the Caribbean Islands to research original documents on the life of Columbus. Their text reflects many little- known facts not generally included in the typical biographies of Columbus. Readers will learn that it was the saga of Leif Erickson that was one of the inspirations for Columbus's voyage to the East. They will also learn that Columbus was such a skilled astronomer that he knew the exact date when the next eclipse of the moon was and used that knowledge to his advantage. They will also learn that though "Columbus was a great man, he was not a modest man. He wanted too much, and so he did not get enough."

Encounter

When Christopher Columbus landed on the island of San Salvador in 1492, what he discovered were the Taino Indians.

Told from a young Taino boy's point of view, this is a story of how the boy tried to warn his people against welcoming the strangers, who seemed more interested in golden ornaments than friendship.

Years later the boy, now an old man, looks back at the destruction of his people and their culture by the colonizers.

Pocahontas

First published in 1946 with the d'Aulaires's beautiful lithographic prints, this tale of the first colony at Jamestown is told from the perspective of the princess daughter of the mighty chief Powhatan. When the Natives judge the white man's magic as evil, John Smith is condemned to death—only the intervention of Pocahontas saves his life and a tentative friendship is established between Pocahontas's tribe and the new colonists. The King of England sends a crown, rich robes and a royal bed to honor Powhatan and he is pleased, but the white man's insistence that the Indians give them corn to sustain them through the long winters threatens their tenuous relationship. Pocahontas's ultimate marriage to John Rolfe, the birth of their son, their voyage to England and presentation to the King and Queen is the stuff of fairy tales except that it is one of the great true stories of America's earliest days.

Jamestown: New World Adventure

A clever tale of two English children who are told the story of their grandfather's experiences as one of the original Jamestown colonists. Pen and ink drawing add to the story!

Pilgrim Stories

This 1910 publication has been newly edited and expanded to include a horizontal history of the world of the Pilgrims of the early 17th century. This replaces the formerly titled Stories of the Pilgrims used in Beautiful Feet Books' Early American History Primary Study Guide. Now children will learn not only the faithful saga of the Separatist's struggle for religious freedom, but also that young Rembrandt was just learning to walk when the Pilgrims arrived in Leiden, that Galileo was fighting his own battle for religious and scientific freedom, and that William Brewster served as clerk to Queen Elizabeth's secretary until the ill-fated execution of Elizabeth's half sister, Mary. Historical figures from around the world will see the Pilgrim's heroic struggle in a more meaningful context. With whimsical illustrations by Christen Blechschmid, children and parents alike will see the world as the Pilgrims saw and lived it.

Squanto's Journey

From the Publishers:

In 1620 an English ship called the Mayflower landed on the shores inhabited by the Pokanoket, and it was Squanto who welcomed the newcomers and taught them how to survive.

When a good harvest was gathered, the people feasted together - a tradition that continues almost four hundred years later.

The Courage of Sarah Noble

The Newbery Honor-winning The Courage of Sarah Noble by Alice Dagliesh dramatizes a young girl’s struggle in colonial America.

Benjamin Franklin

An intuitive understanding of the things children love to know, combined with the d'Aulaire's extraordinary artistic ability make this book on the life of one of America's most beloved founders a perennial classic. Folk art style illustrations are enhanced with pert aphorisms from Poor Richard's Almanac on each page.

Readers will learn that Benjamin was the youngest of seventeen children "all counted" and that "it was a piece of luck that his kite experiment had not killed him." They will also come to know the inventor whose thirst for knowledge led him to constantly seek to improve the lives of his fellow men. Readers will follow his life as a leader in the American Revolution and ambassador to both Britain and France and learn why the French hailed him as the man who "tore the lightening from the sky and the scepter from tyrants."

The Fourth of July Story

What happened on the Fourth of July long before there were fireworks and parades?

Alice Dalgliesh takes young readers back to revolutionary times, back to the colonists’ desire for freedom and the creation of the Declaration of Independence.

George Washington

"He was born in a little red brick house that his father had built on the oyster-shell hill. By that time so much land had been cleared that the wilderness was far in the distance" (10). So begins the simple and inauspicious life of George Washington—a backwoods Virginia boy destined to become the Father of His Country.

Meticulously researched, the d'Aulaires hiked and camped all over Virginia as they imbibed the spirit of this great man. The story follows his growth from young boy to surveyor, to soldier in the French and Indian War where he became a war hero. Then George courted Martha Custis and after their marriage they built a thriving plantation at Mount Vernon. Slavery is depicted as an acceptable fact "where his hundreds of slaves . . . kept everything spick and span and in beautiful order" (40). Then see Washington lead his troops through the dark and hungry days of the Revolution—by his courage and integrity, inspiring the same in his men.

The d'Aulaire illustrations reflect the folk-art style they intended, seeking to depict characters that would appear much as the rocking horses and toy soldiers children played with in their nurseries.

Phoebe the Spy

Someone is planning to kill George Washington, and young Phoebe Frances is trying to save his life. Phoebe gets a job as George Washington's housekeeper, but her real job is to work as a spy.

She listens and watches very carefully, and she meets her father every day to tell him what she has learned. One day Phoebe's father tells her that Washington is planning to leave town in a few days, and the person plotting against him will act before then.

Phoebe is very frightened, but she is determined to figure out who is after Washington before it's too late. . . .

The Winter at Valley Forge

A brief yet penetrating look at the price that was paid during the terrible winter of 1778. Excellent for a K/3 study, yet a book that would be insightful for all ages. Pen and ink drawings accompany informative text.

A More Perfect Union

From the Publisher:

With accurate historical information, this easy-to-understand book tells why and how the Constitution of the United States was created. A More Perfect Union includes a map and back matter with a table of dates and a summary of the Articles of the Constitution.

Dear Benjamin Banneker

Throughout his life Banneker was troubled that all blacks were not free. And so, in 1791, he wrote to Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, who had signed the Declaration of Independence.

Banneker attacked the institution of slavery and dared to call Jefferson a hypocrite for owning slaves. Jefferson responded.

This is the story of Benjamin Banneker - his science, his politics, his morals, and his extraordinary correspondence with Thomas Jefferson.

Year of the Horseless Carriage: 1801

In Genevieve Foster's inimitable style, she brings to life the dawn of the 19th century with all its wonderful advancements in transportation, communication, and technology. This is the age of Napoleon, Jefferson, Toussaint, Livingston, Robert Fulton, Richard Trevithick, Beethoven, Lewis and Clark, Sacajawea, Dolley Madison and much more. Foster's use of "horizontal history", weaves these stories together by delightful retellings and whimsical illustrations.

A Picture Book of Sacagawea

A concise look at the legendary Shoshone woman who led explorers Lewis and Clark on their route from the Dakotas to the Pacific Ocean.

Born in the Rocky Mountains, Sacagawea was taken captive and held hundreds of miles away from home for years.

When Meriwether Lewis and William Clark came through her new village, Sacagawea was offered as a guide since the explorers were heading toward Shoshone territory, where she was from.

Pregnant with her first child and the only woman on the expedition, she accompanied them through the frigid winter of 1804-05 and gave birth to her son as the group traveled west.

Her knowledge of the land, interpretation skills, and diplomatic manner were of great use to the team and helped ensure a successful voyage.

Crossing Bok Chitto

From the publisher: 

On one side of the river lived the Choctaws. On the other side lived the plantation owners and their slaves.

There is a river called Bok Chitto that cuts through Mississippi. In the days before the War Between the States, in the days before the Trail of Tears, Bok Chitto was a boundary. On one side of the river lived the Choctaws. On the other side lived the plantation owners and their slaves. If a slave escaped and made his way across Bok Chitto, the slave was free; the slave owner could not follow. That was the law.

Martha Tom, a young Choctaw girl, knows better than to cross the river, but one day, in search of blackberries, she disobeys her mother and finds herself on the other side. Thus begins the story about seven slaves who cross the big river to freedom, led by a Choctaw angel walking on water! Crossing Bok Chitto will be an eye-opener for kids and adults alike. It documents a part of history that is little-known: the relationship between the Choctaws, members of a sovereign nation, and the slaves who lived in Mississippi during that time before the Civil War, before the Choctaws were forced out of Mississippi to Oklahoma on the Trail of Tears.

Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom

From the publisher: 

I set the North Star in the heavens and I mean for you to be free…
 
Born into slavery, Harriet Tubman hears these words from God one summer night and decides to leave her husband and family behind and escape. Taking with her only her faith, she must creep through woods with hounds at her feet, sleep for days in a potato hole, and trust people who could have easily turned her in. But she was never alone.
In lyrical text, Carole Boston Weatherford describes Tubman’s spiritual journey as she hears the voice of God guiding her north to freedom on that very first trip to escape the brutal practice of forced servitude. Tubman would make nineteen subsequent trips back south, never being caught, but none as profound as this first one. Courageous, compassionate, and deeply religious, Harriet Tubman, with her bravery and relentless pursuit of freedom, is a testament to the resilience of the human spirit.

Thee, Hannah

Catch a glimpse of pre-Civil War Quaker life as Hannah and her family go to Meeting and to market, host a gathering of Friends, and enjoy ice skating and other pastimes.

Nine-year-old Hannah finds it hard to wear a plain bonnet that pinches her ears and a plain dress with no lace! Will Hannah ever understand the value of plain dress and learn to be content as a Friend?

Abraham Lincoln (Daugherty)

"James Daugherty has turned his pen to the greatest American of them all: Abraham Lincoln, sixteenth president of the United States. His book is the people's Lincoln, Lincoln the man - seen through the clear eyes of an artist and poet, American to the bone. It is a story to set the blood tingling and fill the heart with sorrow and glory, to set the footsteps of the mind on leaf-fallen Kentucky ground, on Springfield's pavements, and down the hurried streets of Washington in the spring rain. It is a picture of a tumbling, surging young nation with the pioneer states knocking at the door, the era of the coonskin cap and the French brocade. Across its broad canvas pass the lynx-eyed backwoodsmen, the crinolined belles of the plantation South, the slick politicians of wartime Washington in the 1860s, the desperate fighters in blue and gray. It is the sound of battle, and the bands playing 'Dixie,' and the march of tired feet and the trumpets calling." -description from the original 1943 edition

It is Lincoln as his contemporaries saw him, as we might see him now. He stalks through these pages with his gangling humorous ways like a well-beloved friend.

Originally published in 1943, Daugherty dedicated this beautiful work to his son, "Lieutenant Charles M. Daugherty, American soldier-artist and his comrades in arms throughout the world." In every case where tyranny raises its ugly head, Lincoln has and will continue to stand as America's shining symbol of freedom, justice, and equality.

Buffalo Bill

William F. Cody was born in the middle of the nineteenth century on the plains of Kansas Territory where his family had settled to trade with the friendly Kickapoo Tribe. These Natives were Bill's childhood playmates and at a tender age he traded his brand-new buckskin suit for a little wild Indian pony that he learned to ride like the wind. By the time he was twelve, he was doing the work of a grown man as a cattle driver, camping under the stars each night. When he was caught in a buffalo stampede his horsemanship saved his life. Then he met wilderness scout Kit Carson who taught him how to read the language of the plains. When daredevil riders were needed to carry the mail on the new Pony Express, Bill was one of the first to sign up. Then the Civil War began and Bill went East to fight for Kansas, since that state wanted nothing to do with slavery. The d'Aulaires have captured the allure of one of America's frontier icons in the drama of their lush lithographs and in a text that brings to life the story of the fearless, wild Buffalo Bill.

Notebook by Beautiful Feet Books

This beautiful 7" x 10" composition notebook features 64 pages of acid-free paper, 5/16th inch (7.9 mm) line width, and 80 gsm paper or 55 lb stock. It's perfect for schoolwork and writing.

The otabind binding opens easily and will lay flat for easy writing.

The high quality acid-free paper will help preserve your writing for many years.

Product Description

Sure to ignite curiosity about our nation’s history, this Early American History Through Literature study will take you and your K-3 students through the first Indigenous people of the Americas, the Vikings discovery of America, the exploration, colonization, settlement, and establishment of the United States. Spanning 1000 AD to the mid-1800’s this course makes teaching this literature-rich study easy and fun!

The open-and-go teacher’s guide makes it easy to use the best literature to teach the story of the United States. We have poured over 150+ titles to choose the best books available so you and your students can dive into engaging stories accompanied by beautiful illustrations as you travel through time to meet Leif Erikson, Benjamin Banneker, Myles Standish, Harriet Tubman, Benjamin Franklin, Pocahontas, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and dozens of others.

Learning history is most useful when it shows us what we can aspire to and what we ought to avoid or correct. When students complete this study, we hope that they will hold in honor those heroic individuals who sacrificed for the good of our country, that they will understand the basic foundations of civil and religious liberty unique to America’s founding, and that they will be able to celebrate the rich mosaic of people who contributed to the founding and development of this nation.

*Download the new Picture Packet here.

Scope and Sequence? Click here to download

  • 94 Lessons.
    •2-3 lessons per week for a one-year study.
    •1-2 lessons per week for a two-year study.

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Berg, Rea
Berg, Joshua
and Beautiful Feet Books

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